All posts in OOP

Ubuntu Cola, the way to increase RoR productivity on Windows?A couple of weekends ago I was about to begin a large amount of re-factoring of our Ruby on Rails app (more on that to follow) to move it from a functional wireframe of the app to the final polished first version that users can use without cursing us. However I’d knocked together the wireframe version fairly quickly and had not taken time out to put down some decent test coverage, yes I know, and doing the amount of re-factoring I was planning without having any tests to verify that I haven’t broken anything isn’t a good idea.

So I undertook to get our test coverage up to scratch, I got ZenTest to ensure that the tests get run for every saved modification, which is a great help during development. But this exposed me to something which I had already started to notice but which hadn’t become a real issue yet, Ruby on Windows is slower than a 1-legged dog down the dog track. ZenTest was taking 20 seconds or more to even notice a file had changed and then took even longer to begin the test. Combined with Ruby using 100% CPU most of the time this really dented my productivity and I had to do something. Luckily all that spare time I had while I was waiting for the tests to run every time I pressed save meant I could look into resolving the problem.
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A couple of weeks ago I was looking for some more examples of using the measure() method in one of my custom Flex components and I found this series of excellent tutorials of how to create a custom component by Peter Ent:

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As I have mentioned before, or as anyone who practices OO in Coldfusion will know, that object instantiation in Coldfusion has quite a bit of overhead.

I’ve seen a few thoughts about how to best work around this, such as the above post on Java vs CFC instantiation by Mark Drew and the ideas presented by Peter Bell with regards to iterating business objects which I’ve mentioned before.
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The list I’m referring to is that of fantastic JavaScript frameworks. My list now includes Prototype (and the fact that I didn’t need to look up the URL just shows how many times I’ve recommended Prototoype), Dojo Toolkit, script.aculo.us and now MooTools.

I’ve not had the time to play around with MooTools yet, but simply looking at the help page you can’t deny that it looks sweet.
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